Education

Education

  • Group convened in Durham to discuss rewarding leadership in the classroom, the role of technology and the latest state budget proposal

    March 10, 2015 • Education

    Durham, N.C. - Governor Pat McCrory spoke with teachers from throughout the state today for a meeting of his Teacher Advisory Committee, a committee re-established in September 2013 to address the needs of North Carolina K-12 teachers and students.

     

    “Our budget continues my commitment to teachers for the tremendous work they do every day for our students.  We continue our commitment to modernizing our teacher pay scale; an overall investment of over $1 billion since I took office.  We follow through on our commitment to raise the base pay for North Carolina teachers to $35k and are frontloading the salary schedule so that teachers can earn more money faster.  We are also calling for $15 million for a differentiated way to pay teachers for their leadership and impact on student achievement, " said Governor McCrory. "These proposals, combined with the recommendations discussed today, will form an approach to educating in our state that puts student achievement first."

     

    The governor began the meeting by recognizing attendees, including chairman of the State Board of Education (SBOE) Bill Cobey; SBOE Executive Director Martez Hill; Dr. Lynne Johnson, director of Educator Effectiveness for the Department of Public Instruction; and Sue Breckenridge, executive director of North Carolina Business Committee on Education (NCBCE).

     

    Today was the first meeting of the newly appointed members of the committee for 2014-2015. Governor McCrory took a moment to honor 2013-14 members, as well as the newly appointed members. Afterward, the governor announced that James Ford, a history teacher from Garinger High School and the 2014 Teacher of the Year, would chair the committee.

     

    The new members of the committee:

    • James Ford (Mecklenburg County) – Ford is the 2014-2015 North Carolina Teacher of the Year. Ford is a ninth-grade history teacher at Garinger High School in Charlotte.
    • Maria Topliff (Onslow County) - Topliff is the 2014 North Carolina Virtual Public School Online Teacher of the Year. Topliff teaches with NCVPS’s Occupational Course of Study (OCS) program, where she teachers OCS Blended English 2 and is an instructional leader for American history.
    • Maurice Atwood (Forsyth County) – Atwood is a teacher at West Forsyth High School in Clemmons. He was formerly a teacher at Parkland High School.
    • Kathy Blackwell (Henderson County) - Blackwell is a third grade teacher at Dana Elementary School in Henderson County. Blackwell worked as a teacher assistant for nine years. 
    • Arthina Blanchard (Wake County)- Blanchard is a math teacher at East Cary Middle School in Cary, North Carolina. As a 2014-2015 Kenan Fellow, Blanchard works with NC State University and the NC Museum of Natural Sciences to collect and decipher DNA sequence data from a diverse array of organisms.
    • G. Neil Bolick (Catawba County) – Bolick is a Spanish teacher at Mill Creek Middle School in Newton, North Carolina. Bolick has been teaching for 25 years. 
    • Tonya Kepley (Rowan County) – Kepley is an elementary school math teacher in China Grove, North Carolina. She is a recipient of the 2014 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.
    • Karen Koonce (Cumberland County) - Koonce is a third grade teacher at Van Story Elementary school in Cumberland County. She is a National Board Certified teacher and was the 2008 Cumberland County Teacher of the Year. 
    • Susan Mills (Cumberland County) – Mills is a family and consumer science teacher at Midway High School. While her daughter was in school, she volunteered with various groups, including serving two years as PTA president. 
    • Noreen Naiman (Durham County) - Naiman has been teaching at NCSSM since 1992. She primarily teaches the molecular courses (classical genetics, molecular genetics, and molecular and cellular biology) in the biology department. 
    • Kathy Saunders (Randolph County) - Saunders is a high school English teacher in Asheboro, North Carolina. She is a 2014 Regional Teacher of the Year. 
    • Kristen Smith (Sampson County) – Smith is a high school English teacher in Clinton City Schools. She is a Teach For America corps member and a former Leadership for Educational Equity Policy and Advocacy Summer Fellow in the Governor’s Office. 
    • Chris Weaver (Buncombe County) – Weaver is a third grade teacher at Evergreen Community Charter School in Asheville, North Carolina. He is a 2014 Regional Teacher of the Year. 

    Reappointed members include:

    • Karyn Dickerson (Guilford County) – Dickerson is the 2013-2014 North Carolina Teacher of the Year. She is an academic coach for Guilford County Schools. 
    • Jennifer Currin (New Hanover County) – Currin is the 2013 North Carolina Virtual Public School Online Teacher of the Year, and is a finalist for the 2013 National Online Teacher of the Year. Currin is an Instructional Leader and Online and Blended Learning Teacher at North Carolina Virtual Public School.
    • Rebecca Bishop (Franklin County) – Bishop is a third grade teacher at Franklinton Elementary in Franklin County. At Franklinton, she is a grade-level chair, PTA representative, School Improvement Team member and mentor teacher. 
    • George Brunetti (Pender County) – Brunetti is a kindergarten teacher at Burgaw Elementary School in Pender County. Brunetti specializes in working with English as a Second Language students and has been teaching since 1979.
    • Dot Case (Henderson County) – Case is a United States history teacher at North Henderson High School in Henderson County. She has taught in Henderson County schools for 44 years, and was chosen as Region 7’s Teacher of the Year in 2009-2010. 
    • DeAnna Foust-Platt (Alamance County) – Foust-Platt is a middle school English language arts teacher at Ray Street Academy in the Alamance-Burlington School System. She is Alamance-Burlington School System’s 2013 Teacher of the Year. 
    • Brett Noble (Halifax County) – Noble is an 11th grade American literature teacher at KIPP Gaston College Preparatory in Northampton County. He is a KIPP National Network Featured Teacher, KIPP National Network AP Literature Lead Teacher, and 11th grade and English Department Chair at KIPP Gaston. 

    Throughout the meeting, members discussed reducing the burden of over-testing, teacher preparation and certification, ways to reward teacher performance and leadership and the role of technology in the classroom. Brenda Berg and Tara James of the nonprofit Business for Educational Success and Transformation ("BEST NC") also addressed members.

     

    The role of the committee is to advise the governor on best practices to improve student outcomes, to improve teaching and learning in North Carolina public schools, to identify, recognize and celebrate innovative schools and school systems in North Carolina and to recommend strategies for recruiting and retaining quality educators. The term length is one year.

Proclamation

March 5, 2015Education

WHEREAS, school counselors are employed in public and private schools to help students reach their full potential; and

WHEREAS, school counselors are actively committed to helping students explore their abilities, strengths, interests, and talents as these traits relate to career awarenessdevelopment and personal growth; and

WHEREAS, this year marked a historic moment in the profession of school counselors as the National School Counselor of the Year along with the finalists and semifinalists were invited to the White House by First Lady Michelle Obama to celebrate their accomplishments in helping students achieve success; and

WHEREAS, North Carolina semifinalists, Kerri Bridges, Lisbeth Fillard and Laura Inscoe were honored January 30, 2015; and

WHEREAS, these counselors were judged by a national selection panel on creative school counseling innovations, effective counseling programs, leadership skills and contributions to student enhancement; and

WHEREAS, these counselors distinguished themselves, the profession and our state; and

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim March 5, 2015, in recognition of the “NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL COUNSELING DAY” and commend its observance to all citizens.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this fourth day of March in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.  

 

 

 

PAT McCRORY

Governor

Proclamation

March 1, 2015Education

WHEREAS,art education improves creative problem solving and critical thinking abilities; and

 

WHEREAS, art education helps students appreciate beauty and order and encourages creative expression; and

 

WHEREAS, art education gives students a wider understanding of multicultural values and global citizenship; and

 

WHEREAS, art education reinforces learning in other subjects; and

 

WHEREAS, art education includes art production, art history, art criticism and aesthetics; and

 

WHEREAS, leaders in education recognize the importance of including art experiences in a quality education; and

 

WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina is proud to promote art education as part of a well-rounded education for all grade levels in North Carolina;

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim March 2015, as “YOUTH ART MONTH” in North Carolina, and commend its observance to all citizens.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this nineteenth day of February in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

 

PAT McCRORY

Governor

Proclamation

March 2, 2015Education

WHEREAS, North Carolina’s high school graduation rate in 2014 was the highest recorded in the state’s history, but 16 percent of the state’s children are still not completing high school; and

 

WHEREAS, middle school is a crucial point for dropout prevention; and

 

WHEREAS, future economic development in North Carolina relies on an educated and skilled workforce; and

WHEREAS, the business community is an essential partner in the education of North Carolina’s students; and

 

WHEREAS, the chance to make real-world connections with classroom learning is imperative for a student’s academic achievement; and

 

WHEREAS, job shadowing and mentoring opportunities allow students to explore career options and set goals for the future; and

 

WHEREAS, Students@Work Week is a partnership between the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction and the North Carolina Business Committee for Education; and

 

WHEREAS, more than 24,000 North Carolina middle school students participated in Students@Work Week in 2014;

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim March 2-6, 2015, asSTUDENTS@WORK WEEK” in North Carolina, and challenge business leaders across our state to provide job shadowing opportunities for middle school students.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this twenty-sixth day of January in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

 

 

            Pat McCrory

            Governor

  • March 5, 2015 • Education, • Ethics and Accountability, • Healthcare, • Jobs and the Economy, • Legislation, • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, N.C. -  Governor Pat McCrory’s 2015-2017 biennium budget continues his focus on job creation, education and infrastructure. It also increases help and protection for those that cannot help themselves while maintaining fiscal discipline and increasing government efficiency.  

     

    There are no tax increases in the governor’s budget. 

     

    “This budget builds on our hard-earned successes and lays the foundation for a bright future for all North Carolina families,” Governor McCrory said. “This budget recommits us to the basic values that make our state great. When we unleash our potential in education, transportation, energy and technology, and commit to greater government efficiency and affordability, North Carolina will be second to none.”

      

    Job Creation

    Separate from the budget, the governor is supporting legislative measures that will allocate $45 million for NC Competes and $20 million for the Site Infrastructure Development Fund, a fund designed to attract major manufacturing projects, such as an auto production plant.

     

    Governor McCrory’s budget restores and reforms the Historic Preservation Tax Credit to continue to revitalize main streets across North Carolina while ensuring that the credits are used wisely and where they can have the most impact.

     

    The Innovation to Jobs initiative was created to convert more university research dollars into products and services that are patented and introduced into the marketplace. To support this initiative, the governor’s budget invests $15 million in each year of the biennium in the Venture Multiplier Fund. This capital will be invested alongside private sector dollars in early stage commercial ventures. It also provides $2.5 million in recurring money for the Rallying Investors and Skilled Entrepreneurs, a program that will develop and leverage existing entrepreneurial management talent and recruit world-class investors and skilled entrepreneurs to the state.

     

    Governor McCrory’s budget creates the University Innovation Commercialization Investment program, funded at $7.5 million during the next two budget years and recommends $5 million for the One North Carolina Small Business Program to provide early-stage funding for small, high-growth and high-tech businesses across the state. 

     

    It also appropriates $10 million in each year of the biennium to encourage the production of long-term, sustainable film projects and to further develop the film-making industry within the state.

     

    Education 

    North Carolina taxpayers have historically made a tremendous financial commitment to education, and this budget continues that legacy. More than $12 billion of General Fund monies will be spent on K-12 education in each year of the biennium. It allocates $235 million more in K-12 funding than the 2014-2015 budget—a 2.8 percent increase in spending.

     

    As promised, $111.4 million in each year of the biennium will be spent for teacher salaries to increase teacher base pay to $35,000 a year. This allocation also funds increases for teachers eligible to move to the next tier on the salary schedule. 

     

    To support enrollment growth, this budget provides for the hiring of more than 1,400 new teachers over the biennium as well as provides $128 million to maintain teaching assistant positions over the same time period. 

     

    The budget also rewards high-performing teachers by appropriating $15 million over the biennium to implement teacher pay for performance plans. 

     

    More than $70 million over the biennium will be spent to buy textbooks, instructional supplies and equipment. 

     

    Additionally, North Carolina’s Pre-K program will expand to accommodate 26,800 at-risk four-year-olds.

      

    The governor accelerates the talent pipeline by funding community college classes year-round, including in the summer, just like North Carolina businesses. The budget also invests $5 million for community colleges to purchase current, up-to-date equipment and technology used to prepare students for STEM careers.

     

    Critical Infrastructure 

    The budget commits nearly $4.8 billion to lay the foundation for Governor McCrory’s 25-year transportation vision, which focuses on connecting small towns and economic centers to simplify citizens’ commutes for work, school and recreation. This includes: an increase of $135 million for critical infrastructure investments; $51 million for road preservation and improvements; $36 million for capital repairs and renovations under the Capital Improvements plan and $10 million to ease congestion in rural and small urban areas.

     

    As the governor noted in his State of the State address, he will request a transportation bond of $1.2 to $1.4 billion for quicker construction of projects in the 25-year vision plan. 

     

    He will also request a $1.2 to $1.4 billion general obligation bond to revitalize blighted state buildings that can be saved and build new, workable and efficient facilities for the National Guard, community colleges and other agencies that will help create economic development opportunities for their communities.

     

    Help and Protect Those in Need

    To support the well-being of our most vulnerable citizens, Governor McCrory’s budget commits more than $10.8 billion to the Department of Health and Human Services over the biennium, or more than 24 percent of the General Fund annually. 

     

    Included in this allocation is an estimated need for $287 million in additional Medicaid funding in the first year of the biennium and $460.6 million in year two, taking into consideration forecasted changes in enrollment, anticipated costs per recipient, and utilization of services, as well as federal matching funds. Additionally, it supports the Healthy NC reform plan which puts patients first and controls costs for the taxpayers, while incentivizing health care providers to coordinate care. 

     

    This budget also prudently allocates $175 million over the biennium to the Medicaid Risk Reserve to provide a buffer against financial uncertainty in one of our biggest cost drivers.

     

    The budget provides nearly $82 million over the biennium in new funding for mental health and substance abuse services and increases funding for foster care, adoption support and the collection of child support payments.

     

    The budget also provides funds to modernize and replace equipment for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

     

    It also continues the state’s substantial commitment to the North Carolina Families Accessing Services through Technology (NC FAST) and NCTracks information technology platforms, which are replacing legacy information technology systems to efficiently serve our citizens and pay health care providers. 

     

    This budget fully funds the HOME match program with more than $1.5 million in each fiscal year. These dollars leverage federal matching funds of $20 million and enable the state to collaborate with local governments and nonprofits to serve 340 additional households, create over 400 jobs and generate an additional $1.7 million in state and local revenue.  Additionally, $1 million each year is committed to the Housing Trust Fund to help alleviate the shortage of safe, affordable housing for low- and moderate-income citizens.

     

    The governor’s budget also recognizes the dedication of law enforcement officers who protect us daily and corrections officers who confront the most violent people in our state every day.

     

    Governor McCrory’s budget includes $21 million in funding to help compensate and retain our corrections officers and their supervisors and funds the full five percent step increase for eligible State Troopers in each year of the biennium.

     

    There is additional funding to improve crime lab operations and reduce criminal case backlogs as well as funding for the Highway Patrol, State Bureau of Investigation, and Alcohol Law Enforcement to replace aging law enforcement vehicles to improve safety and reduce maintenance costs. 

     

    Find Efficiencies and Streamline Operations 

    The North Carolina Government Efficiency and Reform (NCGEAR) initiative will save more than $14 million in year one and more than $57 million in year two of the biennium. NCGEAR savings over 10 years are conservatively estimated at more than $615 million in today’s dollars.

     

    To continue customer service improvements at the Division of Motor Vehicles, $30 million is budgeted for technology and equipment modernization. 

     

    The budget carries out government operations efficiencies called for by the Governor in his State of the State address. Future workers’ compensation costs will be reduced through consolidated reporting and an overall improvement in case management to protect against fraud and abuse. 

     

    Attractions such as the North Carolina Zoo, state aquariums, museums and state parks will be transferred from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to the Department of Cultural Resources, which manages attractions as part of its mission. Advocacy groups will be moved from the Department of Administration to the Governor’s Office.

     

    To strengthen the Veteran Affairs and the Office of the Military Advisor, the budget proposes the creation of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs.

     

    This budget streamlines state information technology operations, making them more accountable and coordinated by creating a Department of Information Technology. 

     

    “The members of my administration and I are honored to submit this budget to the General Assembly on behalf of the people of this great state,” Governor McCrory said. 

     

    Click here for a copy of the Governor's Recommended Budget. Click here for a copy of the Budget PowerPoint.

  • Approximately 22,500 Students to Participate in Job Shadowing and Job Mentoring Programs Across North Carolina

    February 27, 2015 • Education

    Raleigh, N.C. - Governor Pat McCrory has declared March 2 - 6, 2015 as Students@Work Week across North Carolina. Students@Work is a job-shadowing initiative involving schools and businesses across the state. The week is focused on raising North Carolina’s graduation rate by offering approximately 22,500 middle school students a chance to connect what they are learning in class with future career opportunities.

     

    "The Students@Work initiative focuses its efforts on middle school students because middle school is a crucial time for dropout prevention. We need our middle school students to be exposed to as many career possibilities as they can be at this point in their lives,” said Governor McCrory. “The future of our state’s economy rests on their shoulders. We need them to be engaged, informed and motivated about staying in school and making the most out of their academic opportunities.” 

     

    The North Carolina Business Committee for Education (NCBCE) and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction are the primary partners for the Students@Work program. Because of their support, more than 100 businesses will provide job shadowing or job mentoring opportunities for middle school students in all 100 North Carolina counties.  Students taking part in this year’s initiative will get a chance to learn firsthand about careers in such fields as finance, health care, hospitality, pharmaceuticals, technology, energy production, the legal system, education and manufacturing. 

     

    For more information about Students@Work Week, visit www.ncbce.org. Click here for a copy of the proclamation.

  • February 27, 2015 • Education, • Jobs and the Economy

    Note: Only two governors made the direct connection between the economy and global education in their speeches.  Delaware Governor Jack Markell, (D) a long-time supporter of world language education, spoke about its importance. "We have also invested in language immersion programs because our children will have greater opportunities in the global economy when they can speak more than one language," said Markell. "After only two and a half years, we have 1,400 students spending half of their school day learning in Chinese or Spanish. And we'll keep expanding next year."

     

    Meanwhile, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory (R) held up a world history teacher as an example. "A key part of any jobs plan is a quality education so students can be competitive in a global economy. Connecting his students to the greater world is the mission of Garinger High School history teacher James Ford." Garinger High School, just outside of Charlotte, is a globally focused school and alumni member of Asia Society's International Studies SchoolsNetwork. 

     

    These states are leading the way, but those that are not should question why they aren't doing more. 

     

    =====

     

    Governors Missing the Link Between Global Competitiveness and Global Competence

    Education Week

    Heather Singmaster

    February 26, 2015

    http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/global_learning/2015/02/governors_missing_the_link_between_global_competitiveness_and_global_competence.html

     

    Most United States governors have completed their annual State of the State and inauguration speeches, which included the outlines of their education priorities. They covered many trending topics such as the Common Core, early childhood education, and Career Technical Education (CTE), the latter of which was cited in 40% of the January speeches alone. As in years past, however, the topic of global education remained relatively unaddressed.

     

    Job creation and meeting the skills gap were outlined as priorities in many speeches. "Skilled job openings are abundantly available and going unfilled," said Iowa Governor Terry  Branstad (R). Many governors' speeches also referenced state competitiveness in the global economy and attracting global commerce. "This very annual address was rescheduled this year because next month I've been invited to Europe to speak at an international gathering of auto manufacturers. Why? Because in advanced manufacturing, Kentucky is a global player, once again," said Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear (D).

     

    How can states create more jobs and be globally competitive? According to Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) "Education is the best economic development tool we have."

     

    So if global competitiveness is a priority—and education is the key—shouldn't governors want to promote a global education?

     

    Only two governors made the direct connection between the economy and global education in their speeches.  Delaware Governor Jack Markell, (D) a long-time supporter of world language education, spoke about its importance. "We have also invested in language immersion programs because our children will have greater opportunities in the global economy when they can speak more than one language," said Markell. "After only two and a half years, we have 1,400 students spending half of their school day learning in Chinese or Spanish. And we'll keep expanding next year."

     

    Meanwhile, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory (R) held up a world history teacher as an example. "A key part of any jobs plan is a quality education so students can be competitive in a global economy. Connecting his students to the greater world is the mission of Garinger High School history teacher James Ford." Garinger High School, just outside of Charlotte, is a globally focused school and alumni member of Asia Society's International Studies SchoolsNetwork. 

     

    These states are leading the way, but those that are not should question why they aren't doing more. Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin (D) worries about the trade offs they are making to maintain small class sizes. "We buy those very small classes at the expense of foreign language, tech classes, the arts, sports, and other critical offerings," said Shumlin. "Our kids suffer as quality declines, and it is their future that takes the hit."

     

    Six other governors made references to having "world-class" schools or education, but their definitions didn't include study of world languages or global issues, which are crucial for building a globally competent workforce for the international companies we are luring here. Many did include the importance of STEM and the skills provided by CTE programs—these too are necessary ingredients for closing the skills gap and therefore of world-class schools.

     

    So in order to address global education and their priorities for the year, governors should start by looking to CTE. Just read this month's featured posts for successful examples of integrating global into CTE, like the afterschool and summer programs in upstate NY that are teaching 21st century skills to fill the skills gap. Or read about the STEM students at Bergen Academy in New Jersey who are working on projects with peers in Japan or the Ohio students who are working with international Fortune 500 companies.

     

    These programs demonstrate local efforts to provide a globally competent workforce that can meet the demands of the 21st century economy. Missouri Governor Nixon is right, "Educating a competitive workforce is something we all can get behind."

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Education